My name is Lisa Orgler and I love teaching garden design in a fun and simple way. Click here to learn more.

Designing Your Garden: Defining Structure

Designing Your Garden: Defining Structure

This can be the most challenging, yet the most fun part of developing your spatial design. Once you create a bubble diagram to organize your outdoor spaces, the next step is defining the structure of those spaces (this is officially called a form composition study).  Will your garden be informal, formal, rectilinear or geometric? Look to the architecture of your house as inspiration or maybe you are drawn to a particular garden style. Structure can also evolve from a theme

The image below shows how you can take a bubble (functional) diagram then transform them into garden structure studies.  I encourage you to explore several options.  Originally I only created the two garden structure studies for bubble diagram #2, then realized I needed to stretch myself, so created a couple more options for bubble diagram #1. My second set felt more dynamic.

My next post will show how I create a preliminary design from one of these studies.  Do you have a favorite from the image above?  If yes, please tell me in the comments below or on Facebook and I'll work on the one with the most votes.  

If you'd like to learn more about this process take a peek at one of these fabulous books:

LANDSCAPING YOUR HOME by William Nelson

PROFESSIONAL PLANTING DESIGN by Scott Scarfone

RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE by Norman Booth and James Hiss

My theme garden workshop and eBook both cover a section on creating structure in your garden. If you'd like to learn more please sign-up below.

Designing Your Garden: The Preliminary Design

Designing Your Garden: The Preliminary Design

Designing Your Garden: Bubble Diagrams

Designing Your Garden: Bubble Diagrams